Home > Cubs > Dumbass from WSJ, Rich Cohen, says that Wrigley should be torn down.

Dumbass from WSJ, Rich Cohen, says that Wrigley should be torn down.

(Wall St Journal)–Having not won a World Series since 1908, and having last appeared on that stage in 1945—a war year in which the professional leagues were still populated by has-beens and freaks—the Chicago Cubs must contemplate the only solution that might restore the team to glory: Tear down Wrigley Field. Having not won a World Series since 1908, the Chicago Cubs must contemplate the only solution that might restore the team to glory: Tear down Wrigley Field. Destroy it. Annihilate it. Collapse it with the sort of charges that put the Sands Hotel out of its misery in Vegas. Implosion or explosion, get rid of it. That pile of quaintness has to go. Not merely the structure, but the ground on which it stands. The Cubs moved into Wrigley in 1916, when it was known as Weeghman Park. Before that, it was the home of the Whales of the Federal League. The Cubs, founded in 1870, had been wanderers, playing on fields scattered across the breadth of booming iron-plated Chicago. The grandest was West Side Park, an opera house for the proletariat, with its velvet curtained boxes, at the intersection of Taylor and Wood on the West Side. Most importantly, the Cubs won there. The glory years before Wrigley are like the age before the flood, when exotic species thrived on the earth, among them the feared Chicago Cub. The team was a powerhouse. Performing as the White Stockings (1876-1889), the Colts (1890-1897), the Orphans (1898–1902) and finally the Cubs, they won with regularity. In 1906 they went 116-36, a .763 winning percentage that remains the greatest season in major-league history. In 1907 they won their first World Series; in 1908, with the unhittable Mordecai “Three Finger” Brown and the Tinker-to-Evers-to-Chance double-play combo that was death to nascent rallies, they won it again. The Cubs then made the fatal mistake of taking up in Wrigley, where the evening sun streams through the cross-hatching above home plate and the creeping shadows form a web that has ensnared the club for a century, where sometimes the wind blows in and sometimes it blows out, and the only constant is disappointment.The entire story can be told via two statistics:

The Cubs pre-Wrigley: 2,971 wins, 2,152 losses.

The Cubs since (before Monday): 7,382 wins, 7,703 losses.

When a house is haunted, you don’t put in a new scoreboard, add ivy, get better food or bigger beers—you move!

 

Who the eff is this Rich Cohen moron and can we get him fired?  Tear down Wrigley Field and salt the earth?  Really bro?  Why don’t we just piss on the Statue of Liberty and melt down the Liberty Bell?  Those things are old too.  I am from Boston and grew up with “The Curse Of The Bambino”.  The 1946 series, Bucky “Bleeping” Dent, Buckner, Grady Little, hundreds of September collapses had an entire region believing in mysticism.  That seemed real.  The Red Sox were a contender essentially every year and every year a bad bounce or an injury or a decision seemed to get in the way.  Then 2004 came around.  A bunch of self-proclaimed idiots won the World Series and New England rejoiced.  It was special.  The Red Sox didn’t have voodoo, or witch doctors, or magic powers in 2004.  They were simply the best team.  They had outstanding front-end starters with Pedro, Schilling, and Derek Lowe and a shut-down bullpen anchored by Mike Timlin, Alan Embree, and Keith Foulke…oh…and they could FLAT-OUT  RAKE!!! One of the best offensive clubs in the history of baseball.  That’s why they won.  Not because they managed to beat a curse.

This guy wants to blame 100 years of failure on the Northside on Wrigley Field itself.  That’s just asinine.  He cited things like weather, atmosphere, and a culture of losing.  Well the first two reasons are bullshit.  Both teams play in the same weather and plenty of teams have won playoff series without having home field advantage.  The 2004 Red Sox for example.  Saying the atmosphere at Wrigley Field is too friendly to win is absurd.  Does this guy mean to say that the great fans of the Florida Marlins were responsible for their two World Series?  The Texas Rangers are good again after being irrelevant for about 15 years….did the atmosphere in the ballpark suddenly change?  Of course not.

I do believe that a culture of losing has permeated the Cubs organization in the past, but those days are over.  This Cubs team has a noticeable competitiveness to them and a palpable positive energy.  I believe that Tom Ricketts is the man ultimately responsible.  He brought in Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer, and let them do their thing.  They have changed the culture of the team and it is apparent on the field early in 2012.  The Cubs don’t have a lot of talent at this point, but things are heading in the right direction.  When the Cubs finally do win it won’t be because they eradicated a curse, but rather they had the best team.  It’s coming Cubs fans.  Ain’t no curses.

Follow the Chief @WindyCitiSports

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  1. May 16, 2012 at 9:32 am

    Cub fan? This guy is a fraud. His picture should be posted and he should be BANNED from Wrigley Field for life. I doubt very much he has the guts to proclaim himself “cursed by birth as a Cub fan”, as I claim, born and raised in Chicago! To use a Chicago term, “This guy is about a jagoff…”

  2. May 16, 2012 at 9:33 am

    And by the way, Rich, Maria Menounos want to go to a Cubs game at Wrigley Field with you…

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